Disorderly conduct?

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Disorderly Conduct in the District of Columbia

What is disorderly conduct?   Any conduct that is open to the general public that:

  •  cause another person to be in reasonable fear that a person or property in a person’s immediate possession is likely to be harmed or taken;
  •  Incite or provoke violence where there is a likelihood that such violence will ensue; or
  •  Direct abusive or offensive language or gestures at another person (other than a law enforcement officer while acting in his or her official capacity) in a manner likely to provoke immediate physical retaliation or violence by that person or another person.
  •  engage in loud, threatening, or abusive language, or disruptive conduct, with the intent and effect of impeding or disrupting the orderly conduct of a lawful public gathering
  • engage in loud, threatening, or abusive language, or disruptive conduct with the intent and effect of impeding or disrupting the lawful use of a public conveyance by one or more other persons
  • engage in loud, threatening, or abusive language, or disruptive conduct in a public building with the intent and effect of impeding or disrupting the orderly conduct of business in that public building
  • make an unreasonably loud noise between 10:00 p.m. and 7:00 a.m. that is likely to annoy or disturb one or more other persons in their residences
  • for a person to urinate or defecate in public, other than in a urinal or toilet
  • person to stealthily look into a window or other opening of a dwelling, as defined in § 6-101.07, under circumstances in which an occupant would have a reasonable expectation of privacy
  •  breach of the peace may be occasioned, to interfere with any person in any public place by jostling against the person, unnecessarily crowding the person, or placing a hand in the proximity of the person’s handbag, pocketbook, or wallet.

What is the maximum Penalty for Disorderly Conduct

The maximum penalty for disorderly conduct in the District of Columbia is 90  days and/or $500.00 dollars.

How are most Disorderly Conducts resolved in DC Superior Court

Obviously, disorderly conduct is not the crime of the century.   The District of Columbia does not stand to benefit by getting a conviction so we can resolve most cases through some form of diversion.   Diversion is a way to resolve the case without a conviction.  

What is I was not Convicted but Received Diversion

If you received diversion and you want to seal your arrest record you only have wait 2 years before you can file to seal the record.